Monday, August 26, 2019
Blue Note At Sea

Review: Newport Jazz Festival 2019

With clear blue skies and temperatures in the 80s, the 65th Newport Jazz Festival took place from 2 to 4 August at Fort Adams State Park and the International Tennis Hall of Fame, Rhode Island. George Wein, now 93, founded...

Scarborough Jazz Festival 2019: a jazz tonic at the Spa

Reviewing the 2018 Scarborough Jazz Festival for Jazz Journal, Brian Payne found a "plethora of riveting performances from an...

Count me in 08/19

Mention last time of my jazz-book discovery in Appleby (The Penguin Guide to Jazz on CD, by Cook & Morton, awaiting liberation from The Hub for £1)...

Nice day for Al Grey

Sir, With reference to the section of Steve Voce's column on Al Grey with the later Count Basie band, may I suggest readers seek out the album Have A Nice Day (Daybreak 2932 002)...

JJ 07/79: Jazz-Rock Fusion, The People – The Music

With jazz-rock, also known as fusion music, now such a popular and commercially viable prospect — for both musicians and record companies — it must come as no surprise that someone has compiled a book devoted solely to this most lucrative branch of the jazz spectrum. Authoress Julie Coryell is the wife of Larry Coryell whose electric group "The Eleventh House" has produced some of the worst jazz-rock excesses in recent years. That said, it has always seemed ironic that whilst critics continually denounce fusion music as "teeny-bopper jazz", groups such as Weather Report constantly come top of many jazz critics polls in reputable magazines. This book does nothing to clarify the paradox. It is not scholarly, nor is it an in depth study of the music. It is but a series of short interviews with sixty-five "stars" of the movement, including several players outside the fusion field; Keith Jarrett, Ron Carter, Ralph Towner and Freddie Hubbard. These interviews are accompanied by many lavish colour and monochrome photos by Laura Friedman, with a discography of each of the featured artists. The players are all American (including several studio players of questionable artistic...

Ranaldo, Jarmusch, Urselli, Pándi

Marc Urselli invited three musicians who’d never met before for a late-night jam at his studio on New York’s Lower East Side:...

Does humour belong in music?

You probably know the story about Al Cohn. Bill Crow tells it in his book Jazz Anecdotes. Cohn was on tour in Europe, and in Denmark he was drinking at a bar...

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