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BBC Radio 4 Today (42:14) reported a Times article that said jazz can nudge people into healthier eating: “People were more likely to pick fresh fruit instead of a donut if they were played a bit of Dave Brubeck or Miles Davis.”

The article drew on a PhD thesis, “Sounds Healthy”, by Danni Peng-Li of Aarhus University in Denmark, who set out with others to investigate the effect of sound on food choices. The research recorded what food image 215 participants were most attracted to when played various types of music. It found that playing heavy metal or hip-hop caused study subjects to choose fattier and more sugary foods.

Reports on the study don’t mention that “jazz” encompasses a wide variety of styles, from the virtually static to the highly abrasive. For example, the popular imagination might today associate “jazz” (as did BBC News at 1pm the same day by illustrating the story with Bill Evans’ intro to MD’s So What) only with so-called “cool”. No account is given of the effect of jazz as diverse as Bessie Smith’s celebration of fast food Gimme A Pigfoot And A Bottle Of Beer or John Zorn and Yamatsuka Eye on restaurant orders or digestion.

The Mastelottos : A Romantic’s Guide To King Crimson

The covering of the King Crimson canon is not a new phenomenon. Adrian Belew recorded several Crimson tracks over his many solo albums. 21st Century Schizoid Band made it the primary raison d’etre of their existence to cover KC songs specifically from that band’s first four albums. The Delta Saxophone Quartet, with guest Gwilym Simcock, recorded an intriguing jazz album of King Crimson covers on Crimson! (Basho, 2016). But largely due to the idiosyncratic nature of Crimson tunes, these covers are not plentiful. Another reason for their paucity is that progressive music is largely, but not exclusively, a male domain (and thereby a bit “niche”). Indeed to paraphrase a standing joke in the King Crimson entourage, there is never a queue for the ladies’ lavatories at a Crimson gig. However, A Romantic's Guide To King Crimson leavens a considerable amount of angularity on these 12 Crimson numbers, spanning the years 1969 to 1995. The Matelottos comprise Pat, drummer with Crimson from 1995 to the present day...

Jazz in Japan: too many singers /2

Many of the best Japanese jazz singers, like Kansai's Masayo Arai, are known only regionally. That goes for a few "good ones" recommended by...

Alan Broadbent: Trio In Motion

In the midst of his whirlwind career as pianist, arranger, composer, conductor and educator, Alan Broadbent retains a commendable respect for clarity, tradition and...

Tricotism: Nostalgia

If anyone subscribes to the inadequate belief that jazz is the “sound of surprise” then Tricotism is not the group for you as they...

Sarah Moule: Stormy Emotions – Songs By Fran Landesman & Simon Wallace

Fran Landesman needs no introduction, for as a lyricist and poet she was unsurpassed. She liked to shock: her luxury item when she appeared...

Treppenwitz: Sister In Kith

Here's a piano trio with a welcome aptitude for moving beyond the obvious. Not for them the sterile trappings of abundant technique, although there's...

Jazz in Japan: too many singers /1

I don't recall what tune the woman attempted to sing. I do remember her voice emerging as a sort of strangled caterwaul, rather akin...

The Bongolian: Harlem Hipshake

Those hip to the London-based Blow Up label and the "modernist" jazz-flavoured music it puts out, will probably better know The Bongolian as multi-instrumentalist...

George Haslam & Friends: Loveland

Apparently this is the penultimate release by SLAM, George Haslam winding things up in May to pursue other ventures (see What's New, 29 March)....

Jane Ira Bloom, Mark Helias: Some Kind Of Tomorrow

The Americans Bloom (born 1955) and Helias (b 1950) are seasoned, quality musicians who have worked together on several acclaimed recordings, such as the...

Black Unity Trio: Al-Fatihah

This is a tricky record to review as there are several extra-musical issues which need to be considered alongside the music. Firstly, there’s the...

Roberto Magris & Eric Hochberg: Shuffling Ivories

The title is a play on Shuffle Along, Eubie Blake’s 1921 Broaday musical, written in partnership with Noble Sissle, and with Blake as a...

Maynard Ferguson: Live & Well In London

This ill-produced compilation leaves a lot to be desired and should carry a health warning regarding the temporary deafness that can result from listening...

What’s new

BBC Radio 4 Today (42:14) reported a Times article that said jazz can nudge people into healthier eating: “People were more likely to pick fresh fruit instead of a donut if they were played a bit of Dave Brubeck or Miles Davis.”

The article drew on a PhD thesis, “Sounds Healthy”, by Danni Peng-Li of Aarhus University in Denmark, who set out with others to investigate the effect of sound on food choices. The research recorded what food image 215 participants were most attracted to when played various types of music. It found that playing heavy metal or hip-hop caused study subjects to choose fattier and more sugary foods.

Reports on the study don’t mention that “jazz” encompasses a wide variety of styles, from the virtually static to the highly abrasive. For example, the popular imagination might today associate “jazz” (as did BBC News at 1pm the same day by illustrating the story with Bill Evans’ intro to MD’s So What) only with so-called “cool”. No account is given of the effect of jazz as diverse as Bessie Smith’s celebration of fast food Gimme A Pigfoot And A Bottle Of Beer or John Zorn and Yamatsuka Eye on restaurant orders or digestion.

The Mastelottos : A Romantic’s Guide To King Crimson

The covering of the King Crimson canon is not a new phenomenon. Adrian Belew recorded several Crimson tracks over his many solo albums. 21st Century Schizoid Band made it the primary raison d’etre of their existence to cover KC songs specifically from that band’s first four albums. The Delta...

Jazz in Japan: too many singers /2

Many of the best Japanese jazz singers, like Kansai's Masayo Arai, are known only regionally. That goes for a few "good ones" recommended by...

Alan Broadbent: Trio In Motion

In the midst of his whirlwind career as pianist, arranger, composer, conductor and educator, Alan Broadbent retains a commendable respect for clarity, tradition and...

Tricotism: Nostalgia

If anyone subscribes to the inadequate belief that jazz is the “sound of surprise” then Tricotism is not the group for you as they...

Sarah Moule: Stormy Emotions – Songs By Fran Landesman & Simon Wallace

Fran Landesman needs no introduction, for as a lyricist and poet she was unsurpassed. She liked to shock: her luxury item when she appeared...

Treppenwitz: Sister In Kith

Here's a piano trio with a welcome aptitude for moving beyond the obvious. Not for them the sterile trappings of abundant technique, although there's...

Jazz in Japan: too many singers /1

I don't recall what tune the woman attempted to sing. I do remember her voice emerging as a sort of strangled caterwaul, rather akin...

The Bongolian: Harlem Hipshake

Those hip to the London-based Blow Up label and the "modernist" jazz-flavoured music it puts out, will probably better know The Bongolian as multi-instrumentalist...

George Haslam & Friends: Loveland

Apparently this is the penultimate release by SLAM, George Haslam winding things up in May to pursue other ventures (see What's New, 29 March)....

Jane Ira Bloom, Mark Helias: Some Kind Of Tomorrow

The Americans Bloom (born 1955) and Helias (b 1950) are seasoned, quality musicians who have worked together on several acclaimed recordings, such as the...

Black Unity Trio: Al-Fatihah

This is a tricky record to review as there are several extra-musical issues which need to be considered alongside the music. Firstly, there’s the...

Roberto Magris & Eric Hochberg: Shuffling Ivories

The title is a play on Shuffle Along, Eubie Blake’s 1921 Broaday musical, written in partnership with Noble Sissle, and with Blake as a...

Maynard Ferguson: Live & Well In London

This ill-produced compilation leaves a lot to be desired and should carry a health warning regarding the temporary deafness that can result from listening...
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The Mastelottos : A Romantic’s Guide To King Crimson

The covering of the King Crimson canon is not a new phenomenon. Adrian Belew recorded several Crimson tracks over his many solo albums. 21st Century Schizoid Band made it the primary raison d’etre of their existence to cover KC songs specifically from that band’s first four albums. The Delta Saxophone Quartet, with guest Gwilym Simcock, recorded an intriguing jazz album of King Crimson covers on Crimson! (Basho, 2016). But largely due to the idiosyncratic nature of Crimson tunes, these covers are not plentiful. Another reason for their paucity is that progressive music is largely, but not exclusively, a male domain (and thereby a bit “niche”). Indeed to paraphrase a standing joke in the King Crimson entourage, there is never a queue for the ladies’ lavatories at a Crimson gig. However, A Romantic's Guide To King Crimson leavens a considerable amount of angularity on these 12 Crimson numbers, spanning the years 1969 to 1995. The Matelottos comprise Pat, drummer with Crimson from 1995 to the present day and his wife Deborah. They are accompanied over the dozen...
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Obituary: Carol Fredette

Although she did tour, including some travels overseas, Carol Fredette chose to work extensively in the New York area and this, allied to relatively...

Obituary: Freddie Redd

Although he played piano as a child, it wasn't until he was 18 and serving in the military in Korea that Freddie Redd seriously...

440 Keys (some more used than others)

“Jazz piano” is no more of a self-contained notion than is “Jazz saxophone”. After all, the music can be played on any instrument, although...

Obituary: Duffy Jackson

There was never any doubt that Duffy Jackson would become a jazz musician, specifically a drummer. The son of a famous jazz bassist, Chubby...

Obituary: Chris Barber

It really seemed as if Chris Barber would go on forever. He was still playing trombone and leading his Big Jazz and Blues Band...

Chick Corea: the musical essence

Nearly a year ago the world lost one of its piano greats in McCoy Tyner. Now it has lost another who operated in the...

Count Me In 02/21

There are historical parallels between jazz and photography - both were nascent (primitive, if you like) in the second half of the 19th century....

Obituary: Sammy Nestico

The American Dream suggests that for those ready to work hard, America will deliver success. For Luigi Nistico, a small boy from Naples...

Obituary: John Russell

The improvising guitarist John Russell died peacefully in his sleep in the early hours of 19 January 2021. Born in Battersea in 1954, John...

Obituary: Junior Mance

Pianist, composer and educator Junior Mance died in his New York City home on 18 January. He was 92, and had been in failing...
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George Benson defers UK dates to 2022

Inspired by Wes Montgomery and long famed for his unison guitar and scat lines, guitarist George Benson was to have done eight UK shows next month. Due to the pandemic, these have been rescheduled to June 2022. Now aged 78, Benson is renowned for albums such as the 1977 Breezin’, which launched his smooth yet virtuosic crossover style. In his biography he described himself as progressing "from blues cat to blues-jazz cat ... from blues-jazz cat to jazz cat ... from jazz cat to soul-jazz cat ... and from soul-jazz cat to R&B-jazz cat." Serious jazz followers may recall his appearance,...
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Jazz Journal articles by month

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Wilderness

Nothing could be more unlike a jazz musician's life than a weekend break in Cornwall, especially if the musician is black and even knowing...
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JJ 04/91: Barney Wilen With The Mal Waldron Trio – Movie Themes From France

This is a much better album than the title might suggest. Wilen still has the blend of tasteful restraint and inventiveness which marked his memorable duet with Miles Davis over 30 years ago for the soundtrack of L'Ascenseur Pour L'Echafaud and the second track here reprises some of that music. The sixth track seems to offer more but the Generique credited to Davis is actually the Benny Golson composition which ope­ned the Jazz Messengers' sound­track for Des Femmes Disparaissent. The other pieces are a mixture of familiar and less well-known themes concluding with Mal Waldron's beautiful Quiet Temple. (I would...

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