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EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL returns to live performance this year, 16-25 July, with concerts including Davina & the Vagabonds, Soweto Kinch, Tim Garland, Zoe Rahman, Laura Macdonald, Brian Kellock, Fergus McCreadie, Jacqui Dankworth, Hamish Stuart & The Tomorrow Band and more. More at edinburghjazzfestival.com.

An evening of improvisation takes place at Amp Studios, Old Kent Road, London SE15 1NL on 23 June, 18:45-22:00. This is Episode 5 in the MOMENT’S NOTICE series that began in London Fields in January 2020; it features, among others, Alice Zawadzki and Elliot Galvin.

MICHAEL PARKINSON is presenting a new six-part series, Parky – My Kind Of Jazz with Sir Michael Parkinson, on Jazz FM from 9-10pm, 13 June to 18 July.

Schapiro 17: Human Qualities

Schapiro 17 is an ensemble led by composer/arranger Jon Schapiro, conceived in 2012, whose previous release New Shoes: Kind Of Blue At 60, a fresh take on the Miles Davis classic album, received a very favourable review from Gordon Jack in August last year. Its follow up, Human Qualities, is a totally different proposition, containing seven of the composer’s originals and Ewan MacColl’s The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face. The Basie-like introduction to Count Me Out is a total blind, as this is soon discarded to introduce a thoroughly modern Rob Middleton saxophone solo punctuated by blasts from the horns, before entering a...

Sons Of Kemet: Black To The Future

An important record and a landmark one, Black To The Future transcends the confines of genre-labelling. It goes further and deeper, and its appeal...

Trondheim Jazz Orchestra and The MaXx: Live

Scandinavian jazz has never been much out of contention, nor has it been short on innovators. If these observations needed illustration, this lively union...

AMM: Industria

AMM is one of those extremely rare groupings of which it might be said that its various forms and line-ups are integral to the...

Dizzy Gillespie: At Newport

A terrific example of Gillespie’s popular big band of the late 50s, showing how it combined verve, skill and dazzling virtuosity with humour, showmanship...

Emborg / Swallow: Over The Rainbow

This strong and melodically attractive release documents the productive meeting of Emborg and Swallow in 1992, when Emborg invited the pioneering bassist to participate...

The Dave Brubeck Quartet With Paul Desmond: Live In Indiana 1958

Brubeckians will rejoice at the appearance of a previously unreleased performance at George Wein’s Midwest Jazz Festival in the intriguingly named French Lick, Indiana...

Down For The Count: At The Cold Stores

Had they called this Music For Saddos it would have said more than At The Cold Stores though I'm guessing it would still sell...

Still Clinging To The Wreckage 06/21, part 3

As he took the alto solo Johnny Hodges's eyes swept the auditorium like beams from a lighthouse. The audience didn't know he was counting. "Eleven,"...

Tom Ollendorf: A Song For You

Recorded at Giant Wafer Studios in Wales, this self-produced debut album finds the London-based guitarist accompanied by two well-known figures from the UK jazz...

What’s new

EDINBURGH JAZZ & BLUES FESTIVAL returns to live performance this year, 16-25 July, with concerts including Davina & the Vagabonds, Soweto Kinch, Tim Garland, Zoe Rahman, Laura Macdonald, Brian Kellock, Fergus McCreadie, Jacqui Dankworth, Hamish Stuart & The Tomorrow Band and more. More at edinburghjazzfestival.com.

An evening of improvisation takes place at Amp Studios, Old Kent Road, London SE15 1NL on 23 June, 18:45-22:00. This is Episode 5 in the MOMENT’S NOTICE series that began in London Fields in January 2020; it features, among others, Alice Zawadzki and Elliot Galvin.

MICHAEL PARKINSON is presenting a new six-part series, Parky – My Kind Of Jazz with Sir Michael Parkinson, on Jazz FM from 9-10pm, 13 June to 18 July.

Schapiro 17: Human Qualities

Schapiro 17 is an ensemble led by composer/arranger Jon Schapiro, conceived in 2012, whose previous release New Shoes: Kind Of Blue At 60, a fresh take on the Miles Davis classic album, received a very favourable review from Gordon Jack in August last year. Its follow up, Human Qualities,...

Sons Of Kemet: Black To The Future

An important record and a landmark one, Black To The Future transcends the confines of genre-labelling. It goes further and deeper, and its appeal...

Trondheim Jazz Orchestra and The MaXx: Live

Scandinavian jazz has never been much out of contention, nor has it been short on innovators. If these observations needed illustration, this lively union...

AMM: Industria

AMM is one of those extremely rare groupings of which it might be said that its various forms and line-ups are integral to the...

Dizzy Gillespie: At Newport

A terrific example of Gillespie’s popular big band of the late 50s, showing how it combined verve, skill and dazzling virtuosity with humour, showmanship...

Emborg / Swallow: Over The Rainbow

This strong and melodically attractive release documents the productive meeting of Emborg and Swallow in 1992, when Emborg invited the pioneering bassist to participate...

The Dave Brubeck Quartet With Paul Desmond: Live In Indiana 1958

Brubeckians will rejoice at the appearance of a previously unreleased performance at George Wein’s Midwest Jazz Festival in the intriguingly named French Lick, Indiana...

Down For The Count: At The Cold Stores

Had they called this Music For Saddos it would have said more than At The Cold Stores though I'm guessing it would still sell...

Still Clinging To The Wreckage 06/21, part 3

As he took the alto solo Johnny Hodges's eyes swept the auditorium like beams from a lighthouse. The audience didn't know he was counting. "Eleven,"...

Tom Ollendorf: A Song For You

Recorded at Giant Wafer Studios in Wales, this self-produced debut album finds the London-based guitarist accompanied by two well-known figures from the UK jazz...

Roy Mor: After The Real Thing

Within a few bars of The Echo Song, the track that opens this album, it’s clear that Mor is an accomplished and sensitive performer...

Ray Russell: mixing it up

Many a veteran jazz musician has been awarded an honorary doctorate in recognition of a lifetime dedicated to the art. Few, however, after decades...

Joe Williams: Four Classic Albums

The Avid classic albums juggernaut rolls on with four LP albums here from the 50s hey-day of poll-winning vocalist Joe Williams. His powerful voice...
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Schapiro 17: Human Qualities

Schapiro 17 is an ensemble led by composer/arranger Jon Schapiro, conceived in 2012, whose previous release New Shoes: Kind Of Blue At 60, a fresh take on the Miles Davis classic album, received a very favourable review from Gordon Jack in August last year. Its follow up, Human Qualities, is a totally different proposition, containing seven of the composer’s originals and Ewan MacColl’s The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face. The Basie-like introduction to Count Me Out is a total blind, as this is soon discarded to introduce a thoroughly modern Rob Middleton saxophone solo punctuated by blasts from the horns, before entering a period of languor replaced by a passage of call and response. This is nicely balanced by the genuine rhythms of Tango, dominated by the baritone of Matt Hong. Hmmm has a shuffle beat around boppish tendencies, with some of its best moments coming from the exchanges between trumpet and saxophone – this contrasts nicely with the imaginative arrangement of the popular MacColl piece, which is carried along by a nice and...
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Still Clinging To The Wreckage 06/21, part 3

As he took the alto solo Johnny Hodges's eyes swept the auditorium like beams from a lighthouse. The audience didn't know he was counting. "Eleven,"...

Still Clinging To The Wreckage 06/21, part 2

As a child Barney Bigard had at first resisted his family's attempts to point him to a career in music, choosing on his own...

Still Clinging To The Wreckage 06/21, part 1

Most of those of us who became aware of jazz in the 30s or 40s accepted as a fact that Duke Ellington's work was...

Notes played, bills & dues paid

“I’m tired of competition. I’m tired of tearing around making money . . . I wanted to find peace of mind.” (1) Let’s not hear it...

Obituary: Norman Simmons

Highly respected, especially by singers, throughout a long and fruitful career Norman Simmons was active as performer, composer, arranger and educator. He was born...

Obituary: Curtis Fuller

One of the best and most consistent hard bop soloists on the slide trombone, Curtis Fuller did not receive the full praise and recognition...

Obituary: Carol Fredette

Although she did tour, including some travels overseas, Carol Fredette chose to work extensively in the New York area and this, allied to relatively...

Obituary: Freddie Redd

Although he played piano as a child, it wasn't until he was 18 and serving in the military in Korea that Freddie Redd seriously...

440 Keys (some more used than others)

“Jazz piano” is no more of a self-contained notion than is “Jazz saxophone”. After all, the music can be played on any instrument, although...

Obituary: Duffy Jackson

There was never any doubt that Duffy Jackson would become a jazz musician, specifically a drummer. The son of a famous jazz bassist, Chubby...
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MU survey shows cost of Brexit to musicians

The cost of Brexit to British musicians is highlighted in a survey carried out by the Musicians’ Union and the Incorporated Society of Musicians. Published on Monday, the survey indicates that only 43% of musicians are still planning to work in the EU in the future, 42% would consider relocating to the EU in order to continue working, and 21% are considering a change of career. The problems arise, says MU chief Horace Trubridge, from the UK government’s failure, when negotiating the Trade and Cooperation Agreement at the end of 2020, to protect performers from a sheaf of bureaucracy reintroduced...
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Buster Williams: Bass To Infinity

As deep as Buster Williams’ opening quote in this insightful film on his life is the seductive sound of his bass growling under his...
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JJ 05/91: Talking to . . . Guy Lafitte

To this day Guy Lafitte still speaks with the rich, dark accents of France's southwest, of which perhaps the nearest British equivalent is the deep burr of Devon. And it is in a remote converted farmhouse about an a hour's drive from Toulouse that he and his wife now live, just a couple of miles of gently undulating val­ley away from Lily Coleman, Bill Coleman's widow. Indeed, it was because of his close friendship with Guy that the trumpeter finally settled in that area of France, where he today lies buried 'in his little cemetery'. 'I must say that when...

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