Juliet Wood: Sconsolato

In brief:
"It should be emphasised that her enunciation is excellent and she clearly chose the material to display her talent at its best. However..."

Yet another name to add to the roster of “jazz singers” is the London-based Juliet Wood, who has assembled an interesting array of tunes for this release and some good quality musicians to take her on the journey.

It should be emphasised that her enunciation is excellent and she clearly chose the material to display her talent at its best. However, she does struggle to convince us of her credentials as she does not appear to have the vocal dexterity to do justice to justice to songs like Midnight Sun and Fascinating Rhythm.

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Her delivery is too mannered by far and often gives the impression of a cabaret singer slightly out of her comfort zone. She makes a fair fist of the two Hoagy Carmichael tunes Lying To Myself and I Walk With Music, although Kirsty McColl’s In These Shoes is not a good choice for this particular singer.

Sconsolato is a disappointment but any further releases from Ms Wood might well lead to your reviewer having to make a welcome reappraisal.

Discography
(1) Manhattan In The Rain; Midnight Sun; (2) In These Shoes; (1) Sconsolato; Chelsea Bridge; Fascinating Rhythm; Journey Within (Voyage); Slow Hot Wind; Lyin’ To Myself; I Walk With Music; Billie Holiday (41.38)
(1) Wood (v); John Crawford (p); Andres Lafone (b); Andres Ticino (d, pc). No recording details supplied. (2) Marisa Wessler (v).
Elsden Music

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