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Lucas Martínez: End Of A Cycle

In brief:
"...the music on this CD is constantly shifting in mood and tempo, keeping things interesting, particularly when we have the addition of Ben Van Gelder’s alto or Alba Careta’s wordless vocal"

Now in his mid-20s, Lucas Martínez has already performed with a number of name musicians on both sides of the Atlantic and states that the bulk of the music on End Of A Cycle was composed during his stay in Philadelphia during 2017.

Despite the claims that all the music is original material from the saxophonist, A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing is definitely the Billy Strayhorn tune, given a less than slavish interpretation on this occasion.

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Martínez certainly has his technique in place, as have his band members – the main problem being a lack of personal identity in a music genre packed with countless tenor saxophonists.

Having said that, the music on this CD is constantly shifting in mood and tempo, keeping things interesting, particularly when we have the addition of Ben Van Gelder’s alto or Alba Careta’s wordless vocal on An Avalanche In Slow Motion.

Whatever reservations one may have regarding individualism in the younger cadre of musicians, Fresh Sound should be constantly encouraged to unveil fresher faces in their New Talent series.

Sample/buy Lucas Martínez: End Of A Cycle at Fresh Sound

Discography
End Of A Cycle; The Lie; A Flower Is A Lovesome Thing; An Avalanche In Slow Motion; Regret; Wake Up; (Requiem Of Oneself; For Those Who Are Still Here (42.24)
Alba Careta (v); Ashton Sellars (v, g) Ben Van Gelder (as); Martinez (ts); Youngwoo Lee (p); Giuseppe Campisi (b); Lluis Naval (d). Amsterdam, 23 & 24 May 2018.
Fresh Sound New Talent FSNT1022

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